Posts Tagged ‘laughing buddha’

A great find for your home, this elegant depiction of Happy Buddha brings joy to any space. Beautifully finished, the statue is made of ceramic clay in earthy tones. The statue measures 10 inches wide and 5.5 inches tall. The image of the Laughing Buddha is based on a wandering Chinese monk, Budai Hotei, in Japanese who lived centuries ago and is believed to be Maitreya, or the Buddha to come. The statue’s plump figure and benign countenance suggest contentment, magnanimity and plenitude. Hand crafted, minor defects and variations may be present and add artistic appeal to each piece.

The laughing Buddha statue is a symbol of happiness and contentment.

The Laughing Buddha is seen in different postures, each having a different significance.

Below are some of the positions of Buddha and it’s corresponding meanings to help you decide what is the best and most appropriate Buddha statues best suited for your home decor.

  • Buddha with a money bag and a gold ingot represents wealth and good fortune.
  • The Standing Happy Buddha brings riches and happiness.
  • Buddha sitting on a large gold nugget with a smaller nugget in his hand ready for giving to others. This position of the Laughing Buddha is symbolic of good luck.
  • Buddha sitting with his fan hat on his head represents enjoyment and good fortune.
  • Buddha holding a gold ingot with his hands upright signifies abundant riches and good luck.
  • Buddha with a fan in one hand and wu lou (bottle gourd) in the other hand brings blessings and good health. The fan wards off misfortune while the wu lou protects from illness.
  • Buddha carrying a bag of gold on his shoulder symbolizes prosperity.
  • Buddha carrying a bag of blessings on his right shoulder and a fan in his left hand protects you and keeps you safe during long journeys.
  • Buddha with a travel stick in his hand protects you from harm during journeys.

Bring joy and happiness to your garden with this favorite Oriental statue. Following the principals of feng shui, it will surely be the focal point of the area.

Often called the Happy Buddha, he is really Hotei, a monk of the T’ang Dynasty. He was known for carrying a sack of candy which he handed out to children in the street. Many Chinese Buddhist believe he was an incarnation of the Buddha Maitreya.

Gautama Buddha was born in 563 b.c. in northeast India. The Buddha was the son of the King of the Sakyas. Suddhodana, who ruled at Kapilavastu, on the border of Nepal. His mother was Queen Maya. He was named Siddhartha. He lived amidst the pleasures of palace life and at age 16 he was married to Princess Yasodhara. They had a son named Rahula. After seeing a decrepid old man, an invalid, and an ascetic beggar, he learned of suffering and decided to embrace asceticism.

Soon afterwards, at age 29, Siddhartha left the palace and his family and went to a hermitage where he became the monk Gautama, or, as he is still called, Sakyamuni (The ascetic of the Sakyas). One day, meditating under a sacred fig tree, he attained perfect illumination (Bodhi). He had become a Buddha. From there on he traveled and preached for 44 years what was to become one of the main religions of the world. He died at Kusinagara at age 80.

Dharmachakra in Sanskrit means the ‘Wheel of Dharma’. This mudra symbolizes one of the most important moments in the life of Buddha, the occasion when he preached to his companions the first sermon after his Enlightenment in the Deer Park at Sarnath. It thus denotes the setting into motion of the Wheel of the teaching of the Dharma.

In this mudra the thumb and index finger of both hands touch at their tips to form a circle. This circle represents the Wheel of Dharma, or in metaphysical terms, the union of method and wisdom.

The three remaining fingers of the two hands remain extended. These fingers are themselves rich in symbolic significance:

The three extended fingers of the right hand represent the three vehicles of the Buddha’s teachings, namely:

  • The middle finger represents the ‘hearers’ of the teachings
  • realizers’
  • The Little finger represents the Mahayana or ‘Great Vehicle’.

The three extended fingers of the left hand symbolize the Three Jewels of Buddhism, namely, the Buddha, the Dharma, and the Sangha.

Significantly, in this mudra, the hands are held in front of the heart, symbolizing that these teachings are straight from the Buddha’s heart.